Landing Page Roundup: Our 10 Favorite Pages from August – September

My goodness, do we have a treat for you this month.

Not only are we featuring a landing page that a world-renowned chef created using LeadPages, but we’re featuring some drop-dead beautiful designs and new templates that have been stretched to innovative and exciting places.

With that in mind, sit back and enjoy our ten favorite LeadPages landing pages for the past month — you just might get a few ideas to improve your own marketing efforts.

1. Andrew Zimmern Travel Guide: New Basic Squeeze Page

Andrew Zimmern s Free Travel Guide LeadPages

Check out how Andrew Zimmern markets his free travel guide with the New Basic Squeeze Page in LeadPages.

What Stands Out Here: Yes, that is THE Andrew Zimmern, he of Bizarre Foods fame, using our LeadPages New Basic Squeeze Page template.

But that’s not the only reason why we’re featuring it. No, it’s the dynamic contrast he creates between the background and the opt-in form that really stands out here. This high-quality image is captivating in itself, but it’s also the perfect foil to the blue opt-in section.

The box is positioned nicely in the dead space of the image, too, which ensures your focus won’t waver between unnecessary imagery. This positioning and use of imagery with a striking opt-in section will surely increase conversion odds. Read More

[Split Test Challenge] Which Headline Do You Think Boosted Conversions 37.02%?

A simple change to a single line of text. . .

In essence, that’s all a headline split test really is — changing a handful of words on your landing page to see which version gives you a higher conversion rate.

But even though it may seem small, this is the kind of split test that has the potential to dramatically impact your landing page conversion rate.

That’s exactly what happened in the split test below from LeadPages user Doug Larson of BarBellShrugged.com, a fitness website for athletes, coaches, and gym owners.

Doug split tested two headlines on a landing page he created (using the eBook Landing Page (from Pat Flynn) LeadPages template) to give away a free weightlifting guide:

  • Headline #1: “An athlete’s guide to perfect weightlifting”
  • Headline #2: “The best exercises and drills to help you lock in perfect technique for the olympic lifts”

One headline is short and general. One is long and specific. Which headline do YOU think won in this split test?

Vote below to reveal the winning split test variation and our analysis! Read More

How to Create Your Own 100% Customized LeadPages Template

check out LeadPages now

The Content Upgrade: 21 Examples of the Strategy That’s Changing Blogging

Every once in a while, a new email list-building strategy comes along that blows the existing “best practice” out of the water.

For years, marketers have been placing an offer to download a high-value lead magnet at the bottom of every blog post to get blog readers to sign up for their email list.

These offers usually look something like this:

oldThis “lead magnet at the end of every blog post” strategy generally worked well. It brought many marketers higher site-wide conversion rates than only having a sidebar opt-in. It also outperformed opt-in forms that didn’t offer a free lead magnet.

But here’s the reason why this strategy is being totally reevaluated:

A high-value lead magnet is a good offer. . . but it’s not the best offer. Read More

[Template Download] The “B2B Style” Enterprise Lead-Gen Landing Page

Click here to check out LeadPages™

- or -

Click here to download this template

If you have LeadPages™, you don’t need to download this template – it’s already available to you inside your LeadPages account. Just log in and you’ll see how super easy it is to customize this page in seconds with no technical knowledge or skills, make it mobile responsive, integrate it with your email service provider or CRM, run A/B split tests, and publish it to Facebook, WordPress, or your own server.

Why Context For Action Is The New Call to Action

I need to clear something up. It’s been bothering me for a while, and it’s a topic that might be a bit polarizing.

I think we’ve placed too much emphasis on the call to action.

Don’t get me wrong. I think a strong call to action is still vital, and I even wrote a post about the importance of a call to action.

I just think we’ve become too infatuated with the call to action.

Read More